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Child Development Stages


This section is devoted to nutrition, immunizations, development, and safety for different age groups from birth through adolescence. Please remember that there is a range of normal development, and that every child will not walk or talk at the exact same time. If you feel that your child is not falling within the range of normal for developmental milestones, you should make an appointment to have your child evaluated by the pediatrician.


Birth

Breastfeeding: every 2-3 hours or 8-10 times a dayFormula: ( 2-3 ounces per feed)
16-32 ounces/day
5 to 10 feedings per day
Hepatitis B #1Erythromycin eye ointment and an injection of Vitamin K will be given in the hospital

  • Average weight and height at birth:Girls: 7 lb. (3.2 kg), 19 ¾ in (50 cm)
    Boys: 7 lb. 4 oz (3.3 kg), 20 in (50.5 cm)

    • What your baby can do at birth:can suck
      can see objects 8 to 12 inches from their nose
      can hear
      Fixes momentarily on objects
      Spontaneous smiles

  • Car seats with every outing
  • Never leave the baby alone on the changing table, bed, sofa, or in the bathtub
  • Keep the crib free of toys, pillows, stuffed animals
  • Monitor tap water temperature-set between 120 and 130 degrees F
  • Smoke detectors-change the battery yearly on your child’s birthday

1 month old

  • Breastfeeding: every 2 to 3 hours or 8 to 10 times a day
  • Formula (4-5 ounces per feed)
    16-32 ounces per day
    5-10 feedings per day
  • Supplements:
    Vitamin D in Breastfeeding dark skinned babies
    and all Breastfeeding premature babiesConsider vitamin D in Breastfeeding fair skinned
    babies who do not get enough sunlight, which is 15 minutes twice a week

  • 1 month check-up with your baby’s health care provider
  • Hepatitis B #2

  • Average weight & height:
    Girls
    8 # 12 oz (4 kg), 21 in (53.5 cm)
    Boys
    9 # 8 oz (4.3 kg), 21 ½ in (54.6 cm)
  • Fixes momentarily on objects
  • Spontaneous smiles
  • Alerts to sound
  • Vocalizes

  • Car seat with every outing
  • Never leave the baby alone on the changing table, bed, sofa,
    or in the bathtub
  • Keep the crib free of toys, pillows, stuffed animals
  • Monitor tap water temperature

2-3 months old

Nutrition

  • Breastfeeding: every 2 to 3 hours or 8 to 10 times a day
  • Formula:
    (5-6 ounces/feed)
    16 – 32 ounces/day
    5 – 10 feedings/day
  • Vitamin D in Breastfeeding dark skinned babies
    and all Breastfeeding premature babies
  • Consider vitamin D in Breastfeedingfair skinned
    babies who do not get enough sunlight, which is 15 minutes twice a week

  • 2 month check-up with your baby’s health care provider
  • DTaP #1 (diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis)
  • Hib #1 (Haemophilus influenzae type b)
  • IPV #1 (inactivated polio vaccine)
  • Pneumococcal vaccine #1

  • Average weight & height at 2 mo.:
    Girls 10 # 8 oz (4.8 kg), 22 in (56 cm)
    Boys 11 # (5 kg), 22 ½ in (57 cm)
  • Social smile
  • Begins cooing at 2 to 3 months
  • Visually follows objects
  • Holds head steadily at 3 mo.

  • Car seats with every outing
  • Never leave the baby alone on the changing table, bed,
    sofa or in the bath tub
  • Keep the crib free of toys, pillows, stuffed animals
  • Monitor the bath temperature
  • At 3 mo. reaching begins-never have your baby within reach of hot liquids (tea cup, etc)

 


 

4-5 months old

  • Breastfeeding: every 4 – 6 hours
  • Formula: (6-8 ounces/feed)
    24-40 ounces/day
  • Begin infant cereal by spoon (rice 1st, then oatmeal, barley, mixed)
  • Apple juice (2 to 4 ounces per day)

 

  • Supplements:
    1. Iron supplementation for solely breastfed babies not started
    on cereal at 4 mo.
    2. Vitamin D in Breastfeeding dark skinned babies and all Breastfeedingpremature babies
    3. Consider vitamin D in Breastfeedingfair skinned
    babies who do not get enough sunlight, which is 15 minutes twice a week

  • 4 mo. check-up with your baby’s health care provider
  • DTaP #2 (diphtheria, tetanus, acelluar pertussis)
  • Hib #2 (Haemophilus influenzae type b)
  • IPV #2 (inactivated polio vaccine)
  • Pneumococcal vaccine #2

  • Average weight & height at 4 mo.:
    Girls 13 # 3 oz (6 kg), 24 ½ in (62 cm)
    Boys 14 # 8 oz (6.6 kg), 25 in (63 cm)
  • Begins rolling over
  • Transfers objects
  • Laughs, says “ah-goo”

  • Car seats with every outing
  • Never leave the baby alone on the changing table, bed, sofa,
    or in the bathtub
  • Monitor bath temperature
  • Keep the baby out of reach of hot drinks and small objects
  • Do not use a baby walker

6-8 months old

  • Breastfeeding: 5 or more times per day
  • Formula: 24-32 ounces/day, 3-4 X/day
  • Infant cereals, juice, strained fruits, vegetables, meats
  • Introduce 1 new food at a time, every 3 to 5 days
  • Sample meals
  • Introduce finger foods
  • Supplements:
    Start fluoride drops if your baby doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated
6 mo. check-up with your baby’s health care provider

 

  • DTaP #3 (diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis)
  • Hib #3 (Haemophilus influenzae type b)
  • Pneumococcal vaccine #3
  • Hepatitis B #3 at 6 or 9 mo. check-up. Hepatitis B #3 may be given anywhere between 6 and 18 months
  • IPV #3(inactivated polio) may be given between 6 and 18 months

  • Average weight & height at 6 mo.:
    Girls 16 # (7.2 kg), 26 in (66 cm)
    Boys 17 # 4 oz (7.8 Kg), 26 ¾ in (68 cm)
  • Sits unsupported
  • Crawling around 8 mo.
  • Likes to suck on toes
  • Reaches for everything in sight
  • Babbles, says “dada” indiscriminately around 7-8 mo.
  • Stranger anxiety begins between 6 and 9 mo.

  • Car seats with every outing
  • Never leave the baby alone on the changing table, bed, sofa,
    or in the bathtub
  • Monitor bath temperature
  • Keep the baby out of reach of hot drinks and small objects
  • Do not use a baby walker
  • Place gates at stairways
  • Swimming pools should be surrounded by a fence with a
    gate that locks
  • Do not give finger foods your child may choke on: grapes, hot dogs, popcorn, hard candies, nuts

8-10 months old

  • Breastfeeding: 3-4 times each day
  • Formula feeding: 16-24 oz/day
    7-8 oz/feed
  • Solids:
    unsweetened cereals, bread, rice, pasta
    mashed vegetables
    soft, peeled fruit cut into small pieces
    chopped chicken, fish
    yogurt
    egg yolks
    mild cheese
  • 4-6 ounces of fruit juice per day
  • Sample meals
  • Finger foods
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride drops if your baby doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated

  • 9 mo. check-up with your baby’s health care provider
  • Hepatitis B #3 (if not given at 6 mo.)Hepatitis B #3 may be given at 6 to 18 months

  • Average weight & height at 9 mo.:
    Girls: 18# 12oz (8.5 kg), 29 ¾ in (70 cm)
    Boys: 20# 4oz (9.2 kg), 28 ½ in (72 cm)
  • Sits well unsupported
  • Begins crawling around 8 mo.
  • Pulls to stand & cruises 9-10 mo.
  • Pincer grasp at 9 mo.
  • “mama” indiscriminately & waves bye-bye at 9 mo.
  • Finger feeds at 7-8 mo.

  • Car seat with every outing (forward facing seats at 1 year of age
    and 20 pounds)
  • Never leave the baby alone on the changing table, bed, sofa, or
    in the bathtub
  • Monitor the bath temperature
  • Keep the baby out of reach of hot drinks and small objects
  • Do not use a baby walker
  • Place gates at stairways
  • Swimming pools should be surrounded by a fence with a gate
    that locks
  • Do not give finger foods that your baby may choke on: grapes,
    hot dogs, popcorn, hard candies, nuts

10-12 months old

  • Breastfeeding: on demand (3-4X/day)
  • Formula: 16-24 oz/day and 7-8 oz per feed
  • Solids:
    • unsweetened cereals, bread, rice, pasta
    • 100% juices (4 oz/day)
    • vegetables and fruits cut into small pieces
    • meat, fish or chicken cut into small pieces
    • whole eggs at 12 mo.
    • cheese, yogurt
  • Sample meals
  • Finger foods
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride drops if your baby doesn’t get tap water or your tap water
    is not fluoridated

  • 12 mo. check-up with your child’s health care provider
  • MMR #1 at 12-15 months (measles, mumps, rubella)
  • IPV #3 (inactivated polio vaccine)at 6 to 18 months
  • Varivax at 12 – 18 months (chickenpox)
  • Hib #4 at 12 -15 months (Haemophilus influenzae type b)
  • Pneumococcal vaccine # 4 at 12-15 months
  • Hepatitis B #3 may be given at 6 to 18 months

  • Average weight & height at 12 mo.:
    Girls: 21# (9.5 kg), 29 ¼ in (74 cm)
    Boys: 22# 8oz (10 kg), 30 in (76 cm)
  • Cruising 9-10 mo. (some children will walk at 10-12 mo.)
  • Stands alone a few seconds
  • Releases objects voluntarily
  • Consonant babbling
  • Some children may have several meaningful words at 12 mo.
  • Imitates
  • Drinks from a cup

  • Car seat with every outing-forward facing seats at 1 year
    of age and 20 pounds
  • Never leave the baby alone on the changing table, sofa,
    bed, or in the bathtub
  • Monitor bath temperature
  • Keep the baby out of reach of hot drinks and small objects
  • Do not use a baby walker
  • Place gates at stairways
  • Swimming pools should be surrounded by a fence with
    a gate that locks
  • Do not give finger foods your child may choke on: grapes,
    hot dogs, popcorn, hard candies, nuts

12-15 months old

  • Breastfeeding on demand
  • May begin whole milk (do not give reduced fat milk
    until the age of 2 years)
  • Table foods-the basic diet
  • Cut food into small pieces
  • Finger foods
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride drops if your child doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated

  • 12 mo. check-up with your child’s health care provider
  • 15 mo. check-up with your child’s health care provider
  • MMR #1 at 12-15 mo. (measles, mumps, rubella)
  • IPV #3 (inactivated polio vaccine)at 6 to 18 months
  • Varivax at 12-18 mo. (chickenpox)
  • DTaP #4 at 15 to 18 mo. (diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis)
  • Hib #4 at 12 to 15 mo. (Haemophilus influenzae type b)
  • Pneumococcal vaccine #4
  • Hepatitis B #3 may be given at 6 to 18 months

  • Average weight & height at 12 mo.:
    Girls: 21# (9.5 kg), 29 ¼ in (74 cm)
    Boys: 22# 8 oz (10 kg), 30 in (76 cm0
  • Walking at 12-13 months
  • Creeps up stairs at 15 mo.
  • Scribbles in imitation
  • Uses 4-6 words at 15 months
  • Follows 1 step commands
  • Uses spoon at 15 to 18 months

  • Car seat with every outing-forward facing seats at
    1 year of age and 20 pounds
  • Prevent poisonings :
  • keep medicines and cleaning products
    in high cabinets or behind safety locked
    drawers
  • keep syrup of ipecac on hand for ingestions-
    call poison control or your doctor before
    giving it
  • Keep your toddler out of reach of hot liquids, the stove, and
    small objects
  • Place gates at stairways
  • Install window guards above the 1st floor
  • Never leave your toddler alone in the bathtub
  • Swimming pools should be surrounded by a fence with a gate that locks

18 months old

  • Breastfeeding on demand
  • Whole milk
  • Do not give reduced fat milk until age 2 years
  • 16 oz milk per day meets calcium requirements
    (500 mg/day ages 1-3 years)
  • Table foods-the basic diet
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride drops if your child doesn’t get tap water or your tap water
    is not fluoridated

  • 18 mo. check-up with your child’s health care provider
  • Varivax at 12 to 18 mo. (chickenpox)
  • DTaP #4 at 15 to 18 mo. (diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis)
  • IPV #3 (inactivated polio) may be given at 6 to 18 months
  • Hepatitis B #3 may be given at 6 to 18 months

  • Average weight & height at 18 mo.:
    Girls; 23# 12oz (10.8 kg), 31 ¾ in (81cm)
    Boys: 25# 4oz (11.5 kg), 32 ½ in (82 cm)
  • Runs
  • Walks up stairs with one hand held
  • Imitates scribbling
  • 10 to 15 words; identifies one or more body parts
  • Feeds self
  • Increased clinginess around 18 mo.
Walking, running, climbing, and into everything

  • Car seats with every outing-forward facing seat
  • Keep handguns unloaded and in a locked place
  • Keep medicines and cleaning fluids in locked drawers
    or cabinets
  • Keep syrup of ipecac on hand for ingestions-do not give
    it before calling poison control or the doctor
  • Keep your toddler out of reach of hot liquids, the stove and
    small objects
  • A playpen is a safe place when you are cooking
  • Place gates at stairways
  • Install window guards above the 1st floor
  • Never leave your toddler alone in the bathtub
  • Swimming pools should be surrounded by a fence with
    a gate that locks

2 years old

  • Reduced fat milk-2 to 3 cups per day
  • Your toddler should eat the same foods your are
    eating but in smaller portions
  • Each child’s needs are different and will vary day to day
  • Toddlers change their food likes from day to day
  • Serve a variety of foods from each food group
  • Do not allow your toddler to run around while eating
  • See the basic diet for guidelines
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride drops if your child doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated

  • 2 year check-up with your child’s health care provider
  • No immunizations unless the immunization schedule was interrupted

  • Average weight & height at 2 years:
    Girls: 26# 4oz (11.9 kg), 34 in (86.5 cm)
    Boys: 27# 12oz (12.6 kg), 34 ½ in (87.6 cm)
  • Between 2 and 5 years, the average child gains
    4 ½ # (2 kg), and 2 ¾ in (7 cm) per year
  • Runs well; walks up and down stairs; climbing
  • Circular scribbling; removes pants & shoes
  • 2 word sentences; uses 50 words
  • Begins using possessives around 2 ½ (e.g. “my ball”)
Walking, running, climbing, and into everything

  • Car seat with every outing-forward facing seat
  • Keep handguns unloaded and in a locked place
  • Keep medicines and cleaning fluids in locked drawers
    or cabinets
  • Keep syrup of ipecac on hand for ingestions-do not give
    it before calling poison control or the doctor
  • Keep your toddler out of reach of hot liquids, the stove and
    small objects
  • A playpen is a safe place when you are cooking
  • Place gates at stairways
  • Install window guards above the 1st floor
  • Never leave your toddler alone in the bathtub
  • Swimming pools should be surrounded by a fence with a gate that locks

3 years old

  • Reduced fat milk-2 to 3 cups per day
  • Your toddler should eat the same foods your are
    eating but in smaller portions
  • Each child’s needs are different and will vary
    from day to day
  • Serve a variety of foods from each food group
  • Do not allow your toddler to run around while eating
  • See the basic diet for guidelines
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride tablets if your child doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated

  • 3 year check-up with your child’s health care provider
  • No immunizations unless the immunization schedule
    was interrupted
  • Schedule your child’s 1st dental check-up

  • Average weight & height at 3 years:
    Girls: 30# 12oz (14 kg), 37 ¾ in (95.6 cm)
    Boys: 32 ½ # (14.7 kg), 38 in (96 ½ cm)
  • Between 2 and 5 years, the average child gains
    4 ½ # (2 kg), and 2 ¾ in (7 cm) per year
  • Rides a tricycle
  • Builds a tower of 10 cubes
  • Knows age & sex
  • Helps with getting dressed
  • Handedness is established
  • Imaginary play
  • Three word sentences; 250 word vocabulary
  • Names 1 color
  • All 20 primary teeth have erupted by age 3
Jumping, running, riding a tricycle

  • Car seat with every outing-booster seat at 40 pounds
  • Keep handguns unloaded and in a locked place
  • Keep medicines and cleaning fluids in locked
    drawers and cabinets
  • Keep syrup of ipecac on hand for ingestions-do not
    give before calling poison control or the doctor
  • Keep emergency phone numbers handy
  • Keep your toddler out of reach of hot liquids, the stove,
    and small objects
  • Install window guards above the 1st floor
  • Never leave your toddler alone in the bathtub
  • Swimming pools should be surrounded by a fence
    with a gate that locks
  • Surface under playground equipment-a rubber mat, 12 inches of sand, saw dust or wood chips

4 years old

  • Reduced fat milk-2 to 3 cups per day
  • Serve your child the same foods you are eating
  • Each child’s needs are different and will vary
    from day to day
  • Serve a variety of foods from each food group
  • Allow your child to make some choices at the
    grocery store
  • See the basic diet for guidelines
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride tablets if your child doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated

  • 4 year check-up with your child’s health care provider
  • MMR booster (measles, mumps, rubella)

  • Average weight & height at 4 years:
    Girls: 35# 4oz (16 kg), 40 in (101.6 cm)
    Boys: 36# 12oz (16.7 kg), 40 ½ in (103 cm)
  • Between 2 and 5 years, the average child gains
    4 ½ # (2 kg), and 2 ¾ in (7 cm) per year
  • Hops on 1 foot; throws ball overhand; climbs well
  • Draws a person with 2 to 4 parts
  • Counts 4 pennies; tells a story
  • Imaginary play
  • Cooperative play with other children
  • Goes to the toilet alone
Jumping, running, riding a tricycle

  • Car seat with every outing-booster seat at 40 pounds
  • Keep handguns unloaded and in a locked place
  • Keep medicines and cleaning fluids in locked
    drawers and cabinets
  • Keep syrup of ipecac on hand for ingestions-do not
    give it before calling poison control or the doctor
  • Keep your preschooler away from the stove when you
    are cooking
  • Install window guards above the 1st floor
  • Never leave your child unattended in the bathtub
  • Swimming pools should be surrounded by a fence
    and a gate that locks
  • Surfaces under playground equipment-a rubber mat, 12 inches of sand, saw dust, or wood chips

5 years old

  • Reduced fat milk-2 to 3 cups each day
  • Your child should eat the same foods you are eating
    but in smaller portions
  • Each child’s needs are different and will vary day
    to day
  • Serve a variety of foods from each food group
  • See the basic diet for guidelines
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride tablets if your child doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated

  • 5 year check-up with your child’s health care provider-this is
    usually the kindergarten check-up and includes school
    paperwork
  • DTaP booster (diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis)
  • IPV booster (inactivated polio vaccine)
  • MMR booster-if not given at the 4 year check-up
  • Some school districts require a PPD (purified protein derivative) test, which is a skin test for tuberculosis

  • Average weight & height at 5 years:
    Girls: 39# (17 kg), 42 ¾ in (108 cm)
    Boys: 41# (18 kg), 43 ½ in (110 cm)
  • Between 2 and 5 years, the average child gains
    4 ½ # (2 kg), and 2 ¾ in (7 cm) per year
  • Skips
  • Names 4 colors
  • Counts 10 pennies
  • Dresses and undresses
  • Domestic role-playing
riding a bicycle, crossing the street

  • Ride in the back seat until age 12 years, always belted
  • Booster seat at 40 pounds
  • Bicycle helmet
  • Teach “look both ways before crossing the street”, and never
    cross without a grown-up
  • Time for swimming lessons, but never let your child swim
    alone
  • Never dive into the shallow end of a pool
  • Life vest for boat outings
  • Keep handguns unloaded and in a locked place
  • Swimming pools should be surrounded by a fence with
    a gate that locks
  • Surfaces under playground equipment-a rubber mat,
    12 inches of sand, saw dust or wood chips
  • Teach your child not to play with matches or lighters

6 years old

  • An ideal day should contain breakfast, lunch, dinner, and
    2 or 3 small snacks
  • Breakfast is essential for school-age children
  • Provide healthy snacks such as pretzels, crackers, fresh
    fruit, or yogurt
  • Reinforce healthy eating habits that will carry your child
    through life
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride tablets if your child doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated

  • 6 year check-up with your child’s health care provider
  • No immunizations unless the immunization schedule was interrupted

  • Between the ages of 6 and 12, the average child gains
    7 # (3-3.5 kg), and 2 ½ in (6 cm) per year
  • Begins losing teeth-replacement of teeth is about 4 per
    year
  • Muscular strength, coordination, and stamina progressively
    increase
  • Increased ability to perform complex movements such as
    dancing or playing the piano
  • First and second grade are devoted to acquiring the
    fundamentals of reading, writing and math skills
  • Many children will begin to participate in organized sports programs
your child is becoming more independent

Ride in the back seat until age 12 years, always belted Stay in a booster seat until the shoulder strap is not across the neck and the lap belt is not over the stomach Bicycle helmet Teach “look both way before crossing the street”, and never cross the street without a grown-up Time for swimming lessons, but never let your child swim alone Never dive into the shallow end of a pool Life vest for all boat outings Keep handguns unloaded and in a locked place Swimming pools should be surrounded by a fence with a gate that locks Surfaces under playground equipment-a rubber mat, 12 inches of sand, saw dust or wood chips Teach your child not to play with matches or lighters

8 years old

  • An ideal day should contain breakfast, lunch, dinner and
    2 or 3 small snacks
  • Breakfast is essential for school-age children
  • Provide healthy snacks such as pretzels, crackers, fresh
    fruit, or yogurt
  • Reinforce healthy eating habits that will carry your child
    through life
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride tablets if your child doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated

  • Yearly check-up with your child’s health care provider
  • No immunizations unless the immunization schedule was interrupted

  • Between the ages of 6 and 12, the average child gains
    7# (3-3.5 kg), and 2 ½ in (6 cm) per year
  • Muscular strength, stamina and coordination increase
    progressively
  • In third and fourth grade, the curriculum requires that
    children use fundamentals learned in 1st and 2nd
    grade to learn increasingly complex materials
  • Increasingly enjoys strategy games
  • Many children become experts on subjects such as sports trivia or stamp collecting
your child tries to do daring things

  • Ride in the back seat of the car, always belted
  • Bicycle helmet
  • Protective equipment for sports, especially roller blading
  • Never let your child swim alone
  • Never dive into the shallow end of a pool
  • Life vest for boat outings
  • Keep handguns unloaded and in a locked place
  • Teach your child not to play with matches or lighters

10-13 years old

  • Prepare healthy, nourishing meals
  • Breakfast is essential
  • Provide healthy snacks such as pretzels, crackers,
    fresh fruit, or yogurt
  • See the basic diet for guidelines
  • Daily calorie needs:
    Boys: 11-14 = 2,500-2,800 calories
    Girls: 11-14 = 2,200-2,400 calories
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride tablets if your child doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated

  • Yearly check-up with your child’s health care provider
  • Td (tetanus, diphtheria) booster at age 11-12 years
  • Varivax (chickenpox) at age 11-12 years if not given earlier. After age 13, 2 doses should be given at least 4 weeks apart

  • Between the ages of 6 and 12 , the average child gains
    7 # (3-3.5 kg), and 2 ½ in (6 cm) per year
  • Age 10 to 13 is considered early adolescence
  • Age of preoccupation with changing body
  • Self-consciousness increases
  • Same-sex group; cliques
  • Increasing involvement in peer activities
your child will do more things away from home

  • Ride in the back seat of the car until age 12 years, always belted
  • Never ride in the bed of a pick-up
  • Bicycle helmet
  • Never let your child swim alone
  • Never dive into the shallow end of the pool
  • Life vest for boat outings
  • Keep handguns unloaded and in a locked place
  • Protective equipment for sports, especially roller blading
  • Talk to your children about the dangers of alcohol and drugs

Teens

  • The keys to maintaining a healthy diet are variety, balance,
    and moderation
  • Self-consciousness increases exponentially and dieting behavior
    is common
  • Daily calorie needs:
    Boys
    2,500 to 3,000 calories
    Girls
    2,200 calories
    *competitive athletes may need to consume between 3,000
    and 5,000 calories per day
  • Supplements:
    Fluoride tablets if your child doesn’t get tap water or your tap water is not fluoridated

  • Check-ups every 1 to 2 years
  • If not given earlier, your teen should receive:
    Hepatitis B series
    Varivax (chickenpox) Td booster (tetanus, diphtheria)

  • Growth spurt peaks at 11 ½ years in the average girl
  • Growth spurt peaks at 13 ½ years in the average boy
  • Puberty in boys begins between 9 and 14 years
  • Puberty in girls begins between 8 and 13 years
  • Menses begin between 9 and 16 years-average in the US is 12 and ½ years
risk-taking behaviors

  • Seat belts always
  • Motorcycle helmets
  • Bicycle helmets
  • Never ride in the bed of a pick-up
  • Discuss the role of alcohol in motor vehicle accidents and
    water-related activities
  • Safety equipment for organized sports
  • Keep all firearms unloaded and in a locked place